Tag Archives: vernacular headstones

Folk Art Headstone, Georgia

Roswell, Fulton County

This headstone is in the Historic Roswell Cemetery. There is no name to be located. I suspect it was on the part that is now missing at top. Below is the backside that looks like six panels are missing. It’s in a section where the markers are from 1900 to 1930.

Walker Grove Baptist Church, Georgia

Keysville, Burke County, Georgia
Louise Randell (1872-1930) This was likely made by the same marker company who made the Alex Steadman marker at Smith Grove Missionary Baptist Church.
I believe the same person who made the Annie McCloud ledger in Smith Grove Missionary Baptist Church also made this one.

Pleasant Hill AME Church, North Carolina

Cowee, Macon County, Georgia

Located in Cowee, or Too Cowee, North Carolina, Pleasant Hill AME Church was started in 1874. Prior to the Civil War, Cowee was home to a significant population of freedmen and women and enslaved people. After the Civil War, Cowee had the most significant population of Black families in this part of Western North Carolina. This church building was built in 1929 and restored in 2009. While the church is no longer active, the cemetery is still used. This church is part of the Cowee Historic District for Macon County, North Carolina.

Rising Daughter Baptist Church, Georgia

Camden County, Georgia

Located in Camden County, Georgia, Rising Daughter Baptist Church, the cemetery is filled with a mixture of vernacular and commercial headstones. I am uncertain of the age of the church and cemetery, but based on headstones I would the age the congregation to be from the 1910s.

This is one of the Madonna markers, my friend Brian and I located in three different cemeteries. A full post about these markers are located here.

These markers show a repeated motif of the loops. If these marks are called something else, please let me know.

Harold and Thelma Swain were murdered inside the church. Their case remains unsolved after DNA evidence exonerated the man who initially went to jail. There is a new suspect in the case. For more information, their story can be read here.

Madonna Figure, Georgia

Camden County, Georgia
Flossy Scott Fisher and child, Rising Daughter Baptist Church. I was able to find the death records for Flossy Scott Fisher. She died in childbirth which explains the Madonna figure and the headstone next to her.

My friend, Brian Brown, and I planned a photo trip while I was down at St. Simons for the week. As I was looking through Find-a-Grave, I noticed these vernacular figures repeated in a couple cemeteries. We decided to take a look. After seeing a couple, we realized they were likely a Mary/Madonna figure. The elements have worn off many of the details.

Since these were all in cemeteries of Black churches, it is possible that a local funeral home did them, or that it was a local artist. This is the first time I’ve personally seen a connection in monuments like these in several cemeteries. Even though likely cast, I do consider these vernacular in nature.

Grace Scarlott, Rising Daughter Baptist Church
Macchca Mowat Alderman, Clinch Chapel Methodist Church
Side view of Macchca Mowat Alderman, Clinch Chapel Methodist Church
Sina Green, Oak Hill Methodist Church
Backside of Sina Green, Oak Hill Methodist Church
Unknown, Oak Hill Methodist Church

Village Cemetery, Georgia

St. Simon’s Island, Glynn County, Georgia
Peter Ramsey, 1873-1931

The Village Cemetery is located on the 258 acre Guale Preserve which is part of the Musgrove Plantation. It is a private cemetery that is only open to the ancestors of the enslaved who are originally buried there. This is one of the most incredible collection of vernacular headstones I have personally had the opportunity to document.

The glasswork and friezes are all done by an incredible artist(s). I tried to do genealogical searches to determine why these markers are here. Sometimes there are clues in the records, but I am unable to determine any.

My appreciation to Brian Brown to showing me this hidden treasure of a cemetery.

Hattie Lee, 1871-1929
John Davis, 1871-1927
Lucinda Ramsey, 1924-1956
William Ramsey, 1887-1952
Aaron Loman, 1891-1931
Camilla Sullivan, 1896-1923
Jim Hightower, 1884-1934
Albert Hampton, 1897-1937
Thomas Lee, 1881-1933 – “Death is eternal. Life why should …”

Bessie McKnight Jones Grave Marker

Sandy Bottom, Atkinson County, Georgia

This is one of the most impressive vernacular markers I’ve ever documented. If you’re familiar with the Nettles Death Masks in Alabama, I consider this marker as important as those masks. Down a sandy road, this small rural cemetery in Sandy Bottom is likely not threatened by development but by time and location. The ledger stone is cracked and the marker is leaning forward.

I was unable to find a great deal about Bessie and her family. She was married to a man who was 20 years older than she was. Her parents were John and Amelia “Mealie” McKnight and her husband was Lonnie Jones. On her birth certificate, it was revealed she died due to malaria.

Lizzie Jackson, 1850-1883, Georgia

A beautiful handcrafted headstone in Memory Hill Cemetery

At one point, it’s been documented that there were a handful of similar terra cotta markers like this one in the African American section at Memory Hill Cemetery. It is believed this marker was made at the McMillan Brick Company, a leading brickmaker in Milledgeville. It is believed the designs were made from stamps in the pottery shop at the brick factory.

The designs on this marker feature a sunflower, acanthus, and diaper (the crisscross pattern).

Sheffield UMC Cemetery, Georgia

Down a sandy road, there is the Sheffield UMC Cemetery which has several vernacular headstones made with tile. Outside of marbles, this is one of the most used materials I see in homemade headstones and ledgers. There was a church next to the cemetery, but it burned many years ago.

Lord. I Am Redy, Georgia

Tifton, Tift County

This vernacular headstone can be found in Greenwood Cemetery in Tifton, Georgia. The KOFP represents the Knights of the Pythias. The interlocking links is a symbol of the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows, and the links stand for friendship, love, and truth.

Eddie Parker Marker, Georgia

Douglas, Coffee County, Georgia

While not a fully handmade marker, I classify this as a vernacular marker for Eddie Parker (1976-2002) because whoever made this was using readily available materials to create it. This is located in the Douglas City Cemetery, Coffee County, Georgia.

Evergreen Cemetery, Georgia

Savannah, Chatham County

I visited the cemetery in Savannah for the first time in 2014. It’s a historic African American cemetery that has faced hardship due to poor management. While the lack of care for the cemetery is problematic, the vernacular headstones remind us how much these people were loved.

As of 2021, the owner of the cemetery has passed away, and families are still struggling to get the cemetery cleaned.