Tag Archives: Episcopal Church

St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church and School, Georgia

Burroughs, Chatham County

Built in 1896, St. Bartholomew’s Church is the longest continuing Black Episcopal congregation in the state. The school, now the parish hall, was built in 1897.

The Victorian elements of the church make it a standout in rural church architecture. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

The church is still active with services offered twice a month. They are held in the afternoon, which is a long-standing tradition of the church.

St. Thomas Church, South Carolina

Cainhoy, Berkeley County

The parish of St. Thomas Church was founded 1706. This structure was built in 1819 after the original building burned. For more info and interior photos, visit the South Carolina Picture Project.

Zion Episcopal Church, Georgia

Talbotton, Talbot County

Built in 1848 and consecrated in 1853, the Zion Episcopal Church in Talbotton, Georgia was recently restored. This carpenter gothic style church served as a congregation for a planter class of families who had relocated from the coast.

Like many antebellum churches, the church was built with a slave gallery that still lines the upper perimeter of the church. The doors were locked, so I was unable to document the inside.

It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

The backside of the church as viewed from the road
Marker for Elizabeth Margaret White, 1813-1850

Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, South Carolina

Spartanburg, Spartanburg County

Built in 1893, the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany is located just off downtown Spartanburg. It’s one of the few Black Episcopal congregations left in the South. Prior to the pandemic, The State wrote an article on how the congregation continues to shrink. At the time of the article, six people were in attendance at the service covered by the newspaper.

St. Andrews Church, Alabama

Prairieville, Hale County

This Carpenter Gothic church is located in Prairieville, Alabama. The congregation of St. Andrews Episcopal Church was founded in 1834. Enslaved laborers built this incredible church in 1856. These builders were loaned to the church by members who were slaveholders.

The cemetery contains a significant amount of ironwork and fencing. Many posts featured common symbols found in a cemetery. The upside-down torch represents a life that has ended or snuffed out. The arrows represent mortality. If you look closely at the road, you will see three leaves, and that represents the Holy Trinity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Nettles Death Masks, Alabama

Carlton, Clarke County

Outside of Carlton, Alabama, Mt. Nebo Baptist Church’s cemetery contains death masks created by Isaac Nettles. Nettles created these masks by making molds of the subjects’ faces while they were still alive, which is different than the traditional death mask which are made after someone passes. The three person marker represents Isaac and Cora’s three daughters, and it rests atop Cora’s grave. There are two other markers made by Nettles. These are deteriorating quickly. In 2020, Hurricane Sally caused significant damage to the masks. These are incredible pieces of folk art. At one point, there were four death masks. One was made for Isaac’s mother Selena/Celina. It was damaged by Hurricane Frederick in 1979. The markers were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2000.