Tag Archives: Fulton County

Funeral Cortège-Atlanta, Georgia

I was stopped in a funeral processional when I realized the casket was being pulled by a horse drawn carriage. It was beautiful to witness. This is a screenshot from a short video that I took. I don’t normally process in black and white, but I liked the contrast of the horse and carriage with the driver. This was near South-view Cemetery.

Clyde King House-Atlanta, Georgia

If you’ve visited the King Plow Arts Center, you have visited the site of the company that Clyde King owned. Initially, it was known as the the Atlanta Plow Company, but later the name was changed to the King Plow Company in 1928.

Clyde and his wife, Clara Belle, lived in a brick home at 1010 Ponce de Leon Avenue. Clara loved that house so much that she wanted to be buried in the backyard. Clyde commissioned a monument that replicates the home, so the Kings would be near the home forever. Their final resting place at Oakland Cemetery is adorned with this monument.

Alpha Delta Pi sorority now use the King house for their national headquarters.

Luther Judson Price-Atlanta, Georgia

Fulton County

The Price House

I owe this post to my two friends, Victoria and Ann. Both had shared photos of Luther Price’s house and said it was being restored. I adore this house, and I am glad that it is getting the attention it deserves.

Luther J. Price

Luther Price was a shopkeeper and the first appointed Black postmaster of South Atlanta. He and his wife, Minnie, lived above the store with their children until they decided to move just down the street on Gammons Street.

The Morse Building
Morse can be seen under one of the power lines with what looks to be the date of 1906. I am uncertain what the other date is.

Victoria was the one who asked why was the building called Morse. I delved into census records to see if I could determine the reason why. Well, Albert Morse and his family lived right behind the store. They lived next to each other according to the 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930 census records. Additionally, Morse is listed as a postal clerk. Since the 1890 Census Records were lost to fire, it is not known if the families knew each other before 1900 and who moved to the area first.

Morse house

The Morse house is still standing. In addition, Albert’s brother, Dr. George Skipworth Morse, was one of the first Black doctors to work for the Atlanta Public Schools. Both families were successful in their own right.

I hope to unravel more about the friendships between these two families.

Both families are buried in Southview Cemetery.

Luther J. Price Middle School is located close to where the Prices lived.

Eldren Bailey, Georgia

Eldren Bailey is seated in front of the sculptures in his front yard.

Eldren Bailey (1903-1987) was a sculptor known for large concrete sculptures. Born in Flovilla, Georgia, he moved to Atlanta at an early age. He first worked with the railroads, but he later became a mason. Many of his sculptures were brightly colored and adorned his front yard. Where he was most prolific though was helping many Black-owned funeral homes with the creation of grave markers.

Admittedly, I had always interpreted these as temporary markers, and for some families, they might have been true. For many, these markers are now permanent. Bailey’s markers differ from many of the other concrete markers seen in Black cemeteries.

Some of his larger pieces did end up in museums, but many of the sculptures seen in his front yard have disappeared.

Bailey’s marker in Southview Cemetery. You can see a similar sculpture behind Bailey in the photo at the top.
This is likely a Bailey marker. It is in Morgan County. Haugabrooks was a Black owned funeral home.
Clayton County, Georgia
Fulton County
Fulton County
A marker that was later incorporated as part of a crypt design
Based on the handwriting and the floral pattern, I suspect this was done by Bailey, too.
$10 receipt for marker that my friend Liz Clappin found

For more reading, I suggest the following:

Black Art Story

Oakland Cemetery Blog Post

Books recommendations

Souls Grown Deep

South-View: An African American City of the Dead