Tag Archives: Chatham county

Marshall Family Plot at Laurel Grove North Cemetery-Savannah, Georgia

I was searching through public domain photos and found this Laurel Grove North Cemetery stereograph of the Marshall Family Plot. Stereographs consist of two nearly identical photographs created to produce a three-dimensional image to be viewed through a stereoscope. Frequently, the images are mounted on paper about the thickness and flexibility of modern-day card stock.

I have photographed one monument in this plot many times. According to the details included on the photo is that the stereograph was taken sometime between 1860-1890. Margaret Marshall Barclay is the daughter of Mary and Colonel James Marshall. For those that know Savannah’s history, Mary Marshall was the founder of the Marshall House.

I’ve always found it difficult to photograph this plot due to the plants surrounding it. I do not know if the ironwork was removed due to deterioration or to help with World War II efforts when iron was in high demand.

The obelisk is the marker for Mary and James Marshall. I do not believe the marker that looks like a small child exists in that plot. The next time I am in Savannah, I will need to double-check.

If you are familiar with the Taliaferro Angel in Bonaventure, Margaret Barclay is Marie Taliaferro’s mother.

Margaret Marshall Barclay, 1841-1866. The rocks under the sculpture’s base mean a life built on a firm foundation.

Pin Point Heritage Museum, Pin Point, Georgia

Located in the A. S. Varn and Son Oyster and Crab Factory, the Pin Point Heritage Museum, the museum shares the story of the freed men and women who founded the Pin Point community in 1890. It showcases the Gullah/Geechee culture.

Residents of the community can trace their lineage to the men and women who were once held in bondage on the Sea Islands. According to the Heritage Museum website, “With the property continuing to be passed down generation to generation, it is now believed to be the largest African-American owned waterfront property on the East Coast.”