Category Archives: Abandoned

Palmer School, South Carolina

Centenary, Marion County

Built in the later part of the 19th Century, the Palmer School is the oldest schoolhouse remaining in Marion County. The school and the adjacent cemetery are named after David Palmer, an SC legislature.

It operated until the 1920s educating white school children from the area.

After years of neglect, the school is going under restoration. You can see older photos of the school on the South Carolina Picture Project website.

Lovett House, Georgia

Sardis, Screven County

This is the view that caught my attention drive g down the road. No one else may see this, but I was reminded of one side of the House of Seven Gables.

The Lovetts have businesses that still carry their name, and a cemetery that is located less from where this house stands.

Old Rico School, Georgia

Chattahoochee Hills, Fulton County

Located in the community once known as Rico, the “Old” Rico School was built before 1900 and was in use until 1932 when a new school was built just down the road. It was a four-room schoolhouse with a central hallway. It was turned into a single home dwelling that is now abandoned.

James Bailey House, Georgia

Coweta County

Located west of Senoia is this gorgeous, neglected home. James Bailey and his wife, Sarah, were married in 1855. They are indentified as one of the founding families of Coweta County.

In searching the history of the house, I discovered that several generations of the Baileys are buried in the cemetery next door, the White Oak Associated Presbyterian Church. From what I can pull together, descendants of the family occupied the house until the 1990s.

According to the 1860 Slave Census, the Bailey family enslaved 16 people, and there were 3 slave houses located on the farm. Those structures seem to be long gone.

The Carpenter Gothic details make this one of my favorite homes. I hope someone can restore the house. You can see additional photos on Old House Love and an old Redfin listing.

Rowland Grove School, Georgia

Burke County, Georgia

Founded in 1926 on the corner of Ivanhoe Plantation, this land was donated by Mrs. Clarissa Dye and her son Rowland Dye to start a one-room schoolhouse. They were the direct descendants of Charles Alden Rowland, the founder of Ivanhoe Plantation.

The school was started when Jim Hall, a sharecropper on Ivanhoe Plantation, asked the Dyes about the possibility of getting land to start the school. When it opened, there were no glass windows, just shutters. It had a white steeple roof. Savella Hall, Jim’s wife, was the first teacher for the school.

Like so many schools, the building had other uses. On the weekend, it served as the benevolent society.

Thank you to the Burke County Archives for confirming the identification of the building and sharing the older photo of the school. Information on the school was pulled from Eugenia Mills Fulcher’s 1999 dissertation, “Dreams do come true: How rural one- and two-room schools influenced the lives of African Americans in Burke County, Georgia, 1930-1955.”

Courtesy of the Burke County Archives and the Burke County Department of Education.
Notice the blue door trim. Many would say this is haint blue. If so, this is the first haint blue I’ve seen on a schoolhouse.

Keysville Evangelistic Church and Cemetery, Georgia

Keysville, Burke County, Georgia

Located across from the post office in Keysville, Georgia is this small church with a mausoleum for Reverend Quillar Vertery Russell (1889-1959) and family. My friend Brian and I had just stopped when a nice Keysville native stopped to chat.

He asked if we were kin to the Russells, and we said no. He said that the Reverend was the church’s founder and owned the lumber mill in Keysville. He told us to go inside.

In diving into the ancestry records, Reverend Russell was a farmer and mill owner. I suspect he founded this church as the Keysville Baptist Church.

Over the years, it changed names to the Keysville Evangelistic Church and finally to the New House of Worship before it closed for good.

Carriage Factory, Georgia

Eatonton, Putnam County

It’s rare to find an antebellum building still standing. While it will be dismantled, I am glad I had the opportunity to photograph this 1818 carriage factory.

A ghost sign was hard to read in person, but the building has served as a carriage factory, a warehouse, and a garage.
These brackets are usually threaded into a beam. They help with building stabilization.