Tag Archives: Savannah

Catholic Cemetery-Savannah, Georgia

Started in 1853, Catholic Cemetery was developed after leaders in the Catholic Diocese asked that there be a Catholic section in Laurel Grove North Cemetery, and their request was denied. After the cemetery opened, many remains were moved from Colonial Park Cemetery to here. Along with the remains, many of the stones were moved, too.

Marker for siblings, John Jasper, aged 11 days, and Mary Frances Rourke, 1874-1880.
Eugene Battle-1901-1912-His epitaph reads “drowned March 14, 1912. A victim of play.”

Sherman’s troops used the cemetery as an encampment area. Many markers were damaged, and the ironwork was used to build fortifications.

Francis Bohan-1871-1900-I love the relief details spell out Frank.

This is an overlooked cemetery when people think of the must-see cemeteries in Savannah. There are several grand Victorian markers. There’s at least one John Walz of “Little Gracie” fame.

Prince-He loved his master. This is a rare marker to a pet in a “human” cemetery.
A Confederate monument dedicated to the service of the “Irish Jasper Greens.”
Rose (1858-1881) and Richard (1855-1882) Roe

Marshall Family Plot at Laurel Grove North Cemetery-Savannah, Georgia

I was searching through public domain photos and found this Laurel Grove North Cemetery stereograph of the Marshall Family Plot. Stereographs consist of two nearly identical photographs created to produce a three-dimensional image to be viewed through a stereoscope. Frequently, the images are mounted on paper about the thickness and flexibility of modern-day card stock.

I have photographed one monument in this plot many times. According to the details included on the photo is that the stereograph was taken sometime between 1860-1890. Margaret Marshall Barclay is the daughter of Mary and Colonel James Marshall. For those that know Savannah’s history, Mary Marshall was the founder of the Marshall House.

I’ve always found it difficult to photograph this plot due to the plants surrounding it. I do not know if the ironwork was removed due to deterioration or to help with World War II efforts when iron was in high demand.

The obelisk is the marker for Mary and James Marshall. I do not believe the marker that looks like a small child exists in that plot. The next time I am in Savannah, I will need to double-check.

If you are familiar with the Taliaferro Angel in Bonaventure, Margaret Barclay is Marie Taliaferro’s mother.

Margaret Marshall Barclay, 1841-1866. The rocks under the sculpture’s base mean a life built on a firm foundation.