Category Archives: Georgia

Williamson Mausoleum, Georgia

Eastman, Dodge County

Orphans Cemetery is located near Eastman in Dodge County, Georgia. It is a small, well-maintained cemetery that features the beautiful Williamson Mausoleum.

Albert Genavie Williamson and his five younger, orphaned brothers moved to Eastman around 1873. Williamson was an entrepreneur who donated the land for the Orphans Christian Church and cemetery.

According to the National Register of Historic Places nomination, A. G. Williamson had this monument built out by the Cordele Consolidated Marble Company after meeting a monument salesman. Made out of of Carrara marble, it was sculpted from a family photograph. It features Mr. Williamson, his wife Martha, and his nephew, Jay Gould Williamson. Interestingly, Jay is buried on St. Simon’s in the Christ Church graveyard.

Outside of the artistic merit of the monument, it’s apparently unusual to find a funerary monument of three people together like this one.

It was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Glass Grave House, Georgia

Whitesburg, Carroll County

Grave houses, also known as grave shelters, are a Southern burial practice that likely began in the Appalachian Mountains. Like mortsafes, they served a similar purpose to protect the grave from robbers. It also helped protect the burial site from the elements. Most grave houses have disappeared over the years due to the elements eventually deteriorating the wood.

This is the final resting place of Nannie Lambert Glass, who died in 1899, in Whitesburg City Cemetery.

Corporal Frank Dorris, Georgia

Douglasville, Douglas County

Corporal Frank Dorris was killed in action during World War I at Belleau Wood, France in Battle of Chateau Thierry on June 8, 1918. The 26 day battle resulted in 1,811 US lives lost. It is unknown how many Germans lost their lives, but over 1,600 were taken prisoner.

This marker can seen in the Douglasville City Cemetery.

Howard Finster’s Paradise Garden, Georgia

Summerville, Chattooga County

Folk artist Howard Finster built Paradise Garden in Pennville, Georgia to share the work of other creators and his own. He is often considered one of the most prolific artists having made over 46,000 different pieces of art. If you’re even in north Georgia, it’s worth a visit. Since my visit in 2014, there has been significant restoration work. They’ve also added places on AirBnb for people to reserve. It was

Evergreen Cemetery, Georgia

Savannah, Chatham County

I visited the cemetery in Savannah for the first time in 2014. It’s a historic African American cemetery that has faced hardship due to poor management. While the lack of care for the cemetery is problematic, the vernacular headstones remind us how much these people were loved.

As of 2021, the owner of the cemetery has passed away, and families are still struggling to get the cemetery cleaned.

Casey’s Hill Cemetery, Georgia

Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia

Casey’s Hill Cemetery, at the back of Crestlawn Cemetery, is a family cemetery for John Casey. Even though you access the cemetery through Crestlawn, it is not officially cared for by Crestlawn. It’s best to visit when it is cold because of all the vegetation. John Casey and family lived on top of this hill. It has experienced neglect over the years, but it has been cleaned periodically through the years.

Henry Haney, fifteen year old fireman, is buried here. He was a part of the “The Great Locomotive Chase.” Additionally, Chief Investigator Bert Donaldson is buried here who was shot and killed during an ambush attack during an investigation. His accused murderers were cleared of all charges.

Mount Olive Cemetery, Georgia

Atlanta, Fulton County

Located on the edge of a park and in the shadows of Buckhead, Mount Olive Cemetery is one of the last tangible pieces of the Black community known as Macedonia Park. Founded after the Civil War of freed men and women, the neighborhood thrived for several decades. It is in desperate need of attention.

Foster-Thomason-Miller House, Georgia

Madison, Morgan County

When I moved back to Georgia in 2013, I was already an avid photographer. My first weekend trip upon my return was to Madison. After living up north for over a decade, I had asked friends to suggest a place for me to get out of Atlanta. They recommended Madison. For those of you know Madison, you know why they recommended it.

This house, the Foster-Thomason-Miller house, was the first house that made me pull my car over immediately. Just doing a google search will show you I am not the first person to be enamored with this house.

After decades of being abandoned, it is finally being restored.

For more more photos and additional information I recommend:

The Forgotten South

Vanishing Georgia

Autopsy of Architecture